Angebote zu "Various" (52 Treffer)

Kategorien

Shops

Cantata No.150. Nach dir, Herr, verlanget mich,...
14,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

A newly engraved vocal score carefully edited and revised from Raphael's reduction issued in conjunction with Bach Gesellschaft edition. One of Bach's earliest extant works (dated 1708 or 1709), this cantata was likely influenced by the those of Dietrich Buxtehude. The opening string sinfonia is follwed by a short opening chorus in motet style. After a brief attractive aria (for soprano), another chorus, also in motet style, commences with an ascending scale after which the line is handed off brilliantly between the various parts. This is followed by a trio for alto, tenor and bass and another chorus featuring a fugal finale. The last movement is a choral chaconne that so impressed Johannes Brahms (one of the few original subscribers to the Bach Gesellschaft edition) that he quoted the bass line in last movement of his Symphony No.4. All in the space of a little over fifteen minutes. Matches the widely available reprint orchestral parts offered by E.F. Kalmus (A4521) and Luck's Music Library (10077). IMSLP page Wikipedia

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Schnyder, D: Music for four Guitars
56,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Daniel Schnyder's 'Music for Four Guitars' reflects on various aspects of guitar music. The composition superimposes modern rhythms of South American provenience with European forms and compositional techniques. The fusion of these elements creates new music which at the same time sounds familiar. The combining of the two different worlds of music illuminates the diversity of today's music and it's beautiful possibilities on infinite new combinations. 'Unveiling of a Canon' is build on a canon, hidden behind rich ornamentations and melodic embellishments. The canon gradually unfolds as the piece develops. At the end of the movement the canon presents itself in its original form. The canon is the strictest musical form. The art of embellishments over a canon is rarely heard today. Jazz and jazz related music concentrate on improvising over chord structures - vertical structures - rather than improvsing over polyphonic patterns which by definition develop horizontally in a musical texture. Switching from the strict canon to embellishments creates tension between freedom and the strict hidden order. We know that very well from the music of J.S. Bach or Bela Bartok. 'Fairytale' is the pragmatic juxtaposition of a completely different way of musical thinking. The movement is based on harmonic and rhythmic fundamentals derived from Brazilian music. Basically the four guitars play on three different layers which rhythmically interact with each other: bass melody, rhythm with complimentary rhythm, and melody. For classically trained musicians the hidden African color of the music may be unusual, new and sophisticated. The accents are delayed to the off-beats. 'Fairytale' combines classical and non-European musical influences in a natural and sophisticated way. In spite of the unusual rhythmic approach, the audience will find this dance-like movement very accessible. 'Coding Against Memory' transforms the musical material from the canon, unweiled in the first movement, in a different way. Single elements of the canon have been isolated and consequently alongated, turned upside down, etc. These techniques are very fundamental and essential in the tradition of European art music but not really common in jazz and other non-written music. The third movement relates to movement one and reflects on the European roots and tradition. 'Dancing With My Lady' corresponds with the dance-like African quality of the second movement but with an emphasis on the inexaustible rhythmic vocabulary of South America, especially the energy-giving, high-spirited Samba. The whole piece therefore is written in a loose thematic ABAB form. This work was originally commissioned by the EOS Guitar Quartet and performed in numerous concerts. Instrumentation: 4 guitars

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Fluchtpunkte
23,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

By the associative-metaphorical title York Höller refers to the determinants of his oeuvre. These references change in various ways and are to be understood in terms of both space (the graphic development of the serial structures on the manuscript paper, called 'tonal figures' by the composer) and time (the real tonal development of the lines, here within the framework of isometric progression) and history (moments of music history appearing as quotations – the String Trio by Arnold Schoenberg in the case of the vanishing points). Virtually developing organically from an improvisation-like beginning via sketches and breaks to emotional conclusiveness, Höller's piece charmingly scored for winds, piano and percussion is a concise summary of musical thinking. Instrumentation: flute, cor anglais, clarinet (bass clarinet), piano and percussion

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Bach, J: Triosonate III in d-Moll
32,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 – 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 – 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d’amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The Andante has three parts. The first begins with a fugue over a continuo-bass. In the second part a new theme appears in measure 49, and Bach develops earlier motives in a total of nine sequences. The triplet motif from measure 21 extends into long, animated strings. A repetition of the first part closes the movement. The second movement Adagio e dolce also appears as the middle movement of the Triple Concerto for Flute, Violin and Harpsichord in C, BWV 1044 which was probably written after the version for organ. Two contrasting themes, one homophone, the other in imitation dominate the first part. In the second part, new ideas are presented in two bar sequence. The Vivace shows elements of a da-capo-fugue – just like the final movements of the Trio Sonatas BWV 526, 529 und 539. But here, the bass is not involved in the thematic development. The form A-B-A prominently resembles the first movement. Triplets are a consistent element of this sonata. In the extended middle section (M 37 – 144) of the third movement they are much more playful and freely varied and sometimes even overlap the development of the main theme. In the third movement the Soprano and Alto parts had to be exchanged in bars 17 – 24 and 161 – 168 to accommodate the instruments’ ranges. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 527

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Triosonate V in C-Dur
23,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. Sonata V is the only one that could be considered a three movement Concerto. The first movement Allegro with its chamber music vocabulary is an excellent example for speculations that the organ sonatas might have had instrumental predecessors. Its style could easily be associated with a sonata for two flutes or two violins and continuo. The formal layout is highly complex. The three-part architecture is strictly symmetrical and this principal not only applies to smaller formal units but also to the composition of thematic material. Despite the complexity, the movement never sounds rigid or dull, the instrumental dialogue freely unfolds and melodic development is always relaxed and playful. The Largo in a-minor has a three-part Da capo aria form with elements of a fugue. The lyrical, expressive melody is answered on the fifth by the second part, while the first continues with a chromatic counter-subject. The middle section opens and closes with two slightly more playful interludes (bars 13 + 33) with the main theme in their center, this time in the parallel of C-major, avoiding chromaticism. After the Da capo the movement closes with a phrygian half cadence (IV6 - V) and leads into the last movement. In comparison with the more ‚modern' theme of the first movement, the fugue theme of the Allegro appears a bit conventional. But the motivic development and the organisation of the two-part form are not any less sophisticated. In bar 29 a new theme is introduced, that is combined with the first in the coda (bars 51 + 141). As in most of the final movements of the trio sonatas, the bass is actively involved in the development of the themes, especially in motivic sequences. Due to the range (theme of the first movement in the Alto part) the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. This also allows playing the bass line with a baritone saxophone without low A. Olaf Mühlenhardt, December 2008 Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 529

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Triosonate IV in e-Moll
21,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The first movement has an unusual form. It begins with a slow introduction - a three-part fugue exposition, with a theme apparently resembling that of the second movement. The Vivace starts on the second eighth in bar 5 and is relatively short, compared to the other sonatas. Its melodic lines are particularly driving and energetic. The fugue theme is answered in the octave, which Bach typically does in slower movements. In the Andante, a two-bar phrasing is particulary noticeable. In the first section (bars 1 - 11) the theme is answered in unison, and after a two-bar interlude the theme appears in the dominant. In the second section (bars 11 - 23) the two solo parts develop motifs from the main theme in a beautiful dialogue. The first section is repeated in e-minor without bars 1 - 7. It is followed by the second section, here shifting to G-major. While the bass has almost exclusively served as an accompaniment so far, it is actively involved in the development of the fugue theme in the last movement, Un poc' allegro. It is dominated by a large variety of bubbly triplet figures. The form can either be perceived in three large sections (I. m 1 - 28, II. m 28 - 60, III. m 60 - 87, coda) or as a fugue-rondo with regular theme appearances. Due to the range and for better playability the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. The slurs comply with the Neue Bach Ausgabe. In the manuscripts their beginnings and ends are usually difficult or impossible to determine. Suggestions are printed in dashed slurs. In the second movement the Soprano and Alto parts were exchanged in bar 38 - 40 to accomodate the Soprano's range. The dotted six-teenth notes in the third movement have to be adjusted to the triplet rhythm. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 528

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Fluchtpunkte
43,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

By the associative-metaphorical title York Höller refers to the determinants of his oeuvre. These references change in various ways and are to be understood in terms of both space (the graphic development of the serial structures on the manuscript paper, called 'tonal figures' by the composer) and time (the real tonal development of the lines, here within the framework of isometric progression) and history (moments of music history appearing as quotations – the String Trio by Arnold Schoenberg in the case of the vanishing points). Virtually developing organically from an improvisation-like beginning via sketches and breaks to emotional conclusiveness, Höller's piece charmingly scored for winds, piano and percussion is a concise summary of musical thinking. Instrumentation: flute, cor anglais, clarinet (bass clarinet), piano and percussion

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Minutentangos
18,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Dancing tango. A stage, a black curtain, a nothing, a something. More? Music. The couple dancing tango finds its analogy in the two clarinets. The dancers are moving on a fictitious stage – different constellations develop in this room, various relationships between the instruments come into being. The thirteen minute tangos trace these different constellations. They create miniature pictures of the situations, sketches, each of them with an approximate duration of one minute, grouped into two units of six minute tangos each and rounded off with the somewhat longer “Canción“. Two people are dancing tango. Two instruments are playing for the dance. Instrumentation: 2 clarinets in Bb (or clarinet in Bb and bass clarinet)

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot
Finale
21,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

With the invention of the saxophone in the early 1840s, transcriptions are useful to present day saxophonists who wish to perform music of various styles and composers, and are thus an important part of the saxophone repertoire. One source of music to transcribe is the wind music of the Classical era. Mozart’s Finale from Serenade in B-flat, KV 361 of the early 1780s was originally scored for paired oboes, clarinets, basset horns (now obsolete), and bassoons, plus four horns and double bass. The work was later performed for eight wind players. The Serenade has also been called “Gran Partita”, implying music for the outdoors. Since one original intent for the saxophone was to replace less-voluminous woodwinds of French military/marching bands, it seems feasible that saxophones, while also handling well the virtuoso demands of the piece, are a good choice for this transcription. Two objectives were in mind while transcribing the Finale. One was to produce a relatively clean manuscript with a minimum of articulation and dynamic markings so as to allow interpretation by the performers. The articulation markings placed at the beginning of the work are provided only as suggestions. Secondly, the melodies were divided among all parts, rather than a solo featuring just the soprano saxophone. The Finale, a molto allegro in rondo form, should sparkle with cheerful charm and wit. Indoors or outdoors, saxophonists should strive for the lightness and grace so prevalent in much of Mozart’ timeless music. Instrumentation: 4 saxophones (SATBar) KV 361

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 14.12.2019
Zum Angebot