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AV: Link Wave Waterproof Bluetooth Speaker - Si...
21,49 € *
zzgl. 3,49 € Versand

Take the music with you, with cutting edge features and powerful sound. Offering the latest Bluetooth connectivity for ultimate device compatibility, this portable speaker can go anywhere due to its waterproof and dust-proof design, handy wrist strap and up to 8 hours playback from a single charge. An inbuilt TF/Micro SD slot adds to its versatility, enabling direct playback of MP3 and WMA files. Choose from 2 contemporary colours to suit the stylish design. Features: Stylish IPX6 waterproof and dust-proof design Powerful 4W speaker and passive radiator provide crisp clear audio and surprising bass Bluetooth 4.2 + EDR technology for lossless CD quality audio and superior device compatibility Inbuilt microphone for hands-free phone calls TF/Micro SD slot for direct MP3 and WMA playback Inbuilt rechargeable battery with up to 8 hours playback Specification: Speaker: 4W + passive radiator Frequency response: 90Hz~20KHz Bluetooth version: 4.2 + EDR Bluetooth range Range: Up to 10m (in clear line of sight) Battery type: 1200mAh (internal rechargeable Lithium Ion) Battery life: 6-8 hours Input connections: TF/Micro SD Card, 3.5mm Line In, Micro USB (charging only) USB input: DC~5V/1200mA Dimensions: 80 x 95 x 50mm Weight: 200g In the Box: Wave Bluetooth Speaker Wrist strap USB charging lead (0.8m) User guide

Anbieter: Sowaswillichauch
Stand: 05.04.2020
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AV: Link Wave Waterproof Bluetooth Speaker - Si...
21,49 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

Take the music with you, with cutting edge features and powerful sound. Offering the latest Bluetooth connectivity for ultimate device compatibility, this portable speaker can go anywhere due to its waterproof and dust-proof design, handy wrist strap and up to 8 hours playback from a single charge. An inbuilt TF/Micro SD slot adds to its versatility, enabling direct playback of MP3 and WMA files. Choose from 2 contemporary colours to suit the stylish design. Features: Stylish IPX6 waterproof and dust-proof design Powerful 4W speaker and passive radiator provide crisp clear audio and surprising bass Bluetooth 4.2 + EDR technology for lossless CD quality audio and superior device compatibility Inbuilt microphone for hands-free phone calls TF/Micro SD slot for direct MP3 and WMA playback Inbuilt rechargeable battery with up to 8 hours playback Specification: Speaker: 4W + passive radiator Frequency response: 90Hz~20KHz Bluetooth version: 4.2 + EDR Bluetooth range Range: Up to 10m (in clear line of sight) Battery type: 1200mAh (internal rechargeable Lithium Ion) Battery life: 6-8 hours Input connections: TF/Micro SD Card, 3.5mm Line In, Micro USB (charging only) USB input: DC~5V/1200mA Dimensions: 80 x 95 x 50mm Weight: 200g In the Box: Wave Bluetooth Speaker Wrist strap USB charging lead (0.8m) User guide

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Decline and Fall of Alternative Civilization , ...
9,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

June McClunaghan, a luckless waitress and ex-flight attendant, ends up in Seattle in the early 1990s after a life of post-Joycean, Cubs-style defeat, and learns to play bass guitar at the height of that good ol’ coffee-swilling “Grunge Mania.” She loves coffee, hates grunge, so she and her friend Dedra Fatiuchka try to start a trashy garage band instead. No dice. But.......Dedra, a talented singer and computer geek who is disillusioned with the digital revolution, pranks together an impressively bogus press kit for the band and, in conspiracy with a studio-geek friend, her voice is overdubbed onto the dead tracks of a defunct band (that couldn’t pay their studio bill) and presto! A demo tape! No one the wiser, the whole shebang is sent to the offices of South By SouthWest in Austin, TX as a joke. SXSW, however, respond by offering the band - which doesn’t exist - a high profile showcase at the 1994 edition of the great, ballyhooed music conference. With the help of two guy friends, a guitarist and a drummer, they manage to slap together a functional combo and then embark to the big event only to lose their showcase by running afoul of one of the head festival honchos who pointedly yanks the rug from under them. But.......another disappointment in June’s doggedly optimistic life, they begin the long trek back to Seattle. When inclement weather forces them off the road, June gets caught in a flash flood incident that leaves her stranded and injured in the middle of nowhere. Rescued by a mysterious hot-rodder, she is thrust into yet another post-Joycean world with even more surreal elements. Here she begins to sense that this strange but benevolent character may actually be the fabled “Seattle Capper” himself - the unseen phantom responsible for a history of distributor cap thefts - and the same one who stole their cap in Arizona while the band was enroute to Austin. Decline and Fall of Alternative Civilization is literary fiction that ma 1. Language: English. Narrator: SPOT. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/147205/bk_acx0_147205_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 05.04.2020
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LucidSound LS25 eSports Headset Kopfband Binaur...
79,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Engineered to Win: LS25 eSports Gaming Headset Crystal-Clear Voice Chat and Exceptional Audio Quality Prove Ideal for Tournament and Competitive Gaming The new LS25 has been developed for the eSports and competitive PC gaming community, concentrating on the features essential to provide superior performance during tournament play. DESIGNED FOR ESPORTS Whether you're gaming online or at a tournament, the LS25 is tuned for competition, with an over-ear design offering immersive sound isolation and impressive acoustics. LucidSound and Quake Champions LucidSound is dedicated to creating the best eSports products by working with top teams and game developers. Comfort Designed for long play-sessions, the LS25 uses advanced memory foam ear cushions and a breathable cloth liner that conform to the individual user and offer superior comfort. INTUITIVE CONTROL SYSTEM Rotate outer ring to control volume Quick-access volume and mute controls are integrated into the earcups. CRYSTAL-CLEAR CHAT WITH DUAL MICS Dual microphone design offers a flexible boom mic for gaming online and talking to your team. Remove the boom mic and use the integrated mic for mobile. Boom mic includes optional windsock and new unidirectional design for reduced background noise in competitive eSports environments. SOUND QUALITY Custom tuned 50mm speakers with state-of-the-art neodymium magnets provide deep bass and clear highs. Immerse yourself in the expertly crafted, signature LucidSound audio acoustics. VERSATILE DUAL CABLE DESIGN Works out of the box with all major gaming devices. The package includes a 1.2m, 3.5mm cable for mobile, console and laptop use and a second 3m cable with PC splitter for PCs with separate mic and headphone jacks. DURABLE AND PORTABLE Many gaming headsets are too fragile to take on the road. The LS25’s versatility and rugged design means you can bring it to your friend’s house, play Nintendo Switch on the plane, listen to music with your mobile device and take calls using either the detachable boom mic or integrated mic.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Bach, J: Triosonate VI in G-Dur
31,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 – 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 – 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d’amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The sixth Trio Sonata might be the only one that Bach explicitly composed for this collection. The particularly high number of changes in the manuscript might indicate that he was still working on it when he copied the Sonata into the collection. The first movement Vivace has a certain resemblance with the first movement of Bach’s Italian Concerto for harpsichord. It is a concerto movement, but the solo and tutti passages are often ambiguous. The unison in the beginning is unparalleled in the Trio Sonatas and emphasizes the concerto character of this movement. The first theme returns in modified forms: syncopated (bar 53), in sequence (bar 73) and embellished in minor (101). Extended arpeggios in the interludes (T 37 – 52, 85 – 100 und 137 – 152) and a remarkably active bass (bar 101) effectively contrast the homophone main theme. The declamatory character and its rhythmically and melodically independent solo parts make the Lento sound more like an aria from Bach’s cantatas with obligato (violin, flute or oboe) than a chamber sonata. There are elements of the Siciliano (esp. the dotted 6/8 rhythms) and the bass gets involved in the thematic development. Like in Sonatas BWV 526, 528, und 529 the bass is also involved in the development of the fugue subject in the last movement Allegro. While the first theme only employs one and a half bars, the second theme in the parallel minor stretches over four bars and dominates the middle section with motivic sequences and frequent modulations. Due to the range (first theme soprano) the Sonata was transposed a half-step above the original key. For the same reason, the upper parts were switched in bars 156 – 160. The alto part was transposed an octave down in bars 21 and 22 (with two eight notes pickup). The 8va in the third movement can be performed as written. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) and cello ad lib BWV 530

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Saint-Saëns, C: Carnaval des Animaux
47,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

'Who does not know Carnival of the Animals with its music bursting with joy of living, grotesque humour, virtuosity and incomparable charm. Although its composer imposed a performance ban upon his work merely a few years after he had written the piece in February 1886, it is probably one of the best-known compositions within today´s classical concert repertory. In spring 2004, I decided to venture on the task of arranging this piece – which was originally scored for two pianos, a string quartet, double bass, flute, clarinet and xylophone – for my saxophone quartet clair-obscur. With some movements everything worked out well right from the start; for others, however, there existed four of five different versions, which we tested, dismissed, altered until we finally found a perfect solution in the form of the arrangement on hand offering each musician of the quartet the opportunity to exhibit his or her talents as a soloist and, at the same time, as a member of the ensemble. Yet, this is not the only reason why this piece is one of the cornerstones of our present repertory: Innumerable performances – whether for children or in the concert hall, whether presented with the German comedian Loriot’s well-known verses to accompany it or in its classical concertante version – have shown that this arrangement of Carnival of the Animals electrifies every audience.' (Christoph Enzel) Instrumentation: 4 saxophones (SATBar)

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Bach, J: Triosonate III in d-Moll
32,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 – 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 – 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d’amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The Andante has three parts. The first begins with a fugue over a continuo-bass. In the second part a new theme appears in measure 49, and Bach develops earlier motives in a total of nine sequences. The triplet motif from measure 21 extends into long, animated strings. A repetition of the first part closes the movement. The second movement Adagio e dolce also appears as the middle movement of the Triple Concerto for Flute, Violin and Harpsichord in C, BWV 1044 which was probably written after the version for organ. Two contrasting themes, one homophone, the other in imitation dominate the first part. In the second part, new ideas are presented in two bar sequence. The Vivace shows elements of a da-capo-fugue – just like the final movements of the Trio Sonatas BWV 526, 529 und 539. But here, the bass is not involved in the thematic development. The form A-B-A prominently resembles the first movement. Triplets are a consistent element of this sonata. In the extended middle section (M 37 – 144) of the third movement they are much more playful and freely varied and sometimes even overlap the development of the main theme. In the third movement the Soprano and Alto parts had to be exchanged in bars 17 – 24 and 161 – 168 to accommodate the instruments’ ranges. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 527

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Triosonate V in C-Dur
23,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. Sonata V is the only one that could be considered a three movement Concerto. The first movement Allegro with its chamber music vocabulary is an excellent example for speculations that the organ sonatas might have had instrumental predecessors. Its style could easily be associated with a sonata for two flutes or two violins and continuo. The formal layout is highly complex. The three-part architecture is strictly symmetrical and this principal not only applies to smaller formal units but also to the composition of thematic material. Despite the complexity, the movement never sounds rigid or dull, the instrumental dialogue freely unfolds and melodic development is always relaxed and playful. The Largo in a-minor has a three-part Da capo aria form with elements of a fugue. The lyrical, expressive melody is answered on the fifth by the second part, while the first continues with a chromatic counter-subject. The middle section opens and closes with two slightly more playful interludes (bars 13 + 33) with the main theme in their center, this time in the parallel of C-major, avoiding chromaticism. After the Da capo the movement closes with a phrygian half cadence (IV6 - V) and leads into the last movement. In comparison with the more ‚modern' theme of the first movement, the fugue theme of the Allegro appears a bit conventional. But the motivic development and the organisation of the two-part form are not any less sophisticated. In bar 29 a new theme is introduced, that is combined with the first in the coda (bars 51 + 141). As in most of the final movements of the trio sonatas, the bass is actively involved in the development of the themes, especially in motivic sequences. Due to the range (theme of the first movement in the Alto part) the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. This also allows playing the bass line with a baritone saxophone without low A. Olaf Mühlenhardt, December 2008 Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 529

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.04.2020
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Triosonate IV in e-Moll
21,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The first movement has an unusual form. It begins with a slow introduction - a three-part fugue exposition, with a theme apparently resembling that of the second movement. The Vivace starts on the second eighth in bar 5 and is relatively short, compared to the other sonatas. Its melodic lines are particularly driving and energetic. The fugue theme is answered in the octave, which Bach typically does in slower movements. In the Andante, a two-bar phrasing is particulary noticeable. In the first section (bars 1 - 11) the theme is answered in unison, and after a two-bar interlude the theme appears in the dominant. In the second section (bars 11 - 23) the two solo parts develop motifs from the main theme in a beautiful dialogue. The first section is repeated in e-minor without bars 1 - 7. It is followed by the second section, here shifting to G-major. While the bass has almost exclusively served as an accompaniment so far, it is actively involved in the development of the fugue theme in the last movement, Un poc' allegro. It is dominated by a large variety of bubbly triplet figures. The form can either be perceived in three large sections (I. m 1 - 28, II. m 28 - 60, III. m 60 - 87, coda) or as a fugue-rondo with regular theme appearances. Due to the range and for better playability the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. The slurs comply with the Neue Bach Ausgabe. In the manuscripts their beginnings and ends are usually difficult or impossible to determine. Suggestions are printed in dashed slurs. In the second movement the Soprano and Alto parts were exchanged in bar 38 - 40 to accomodate the Soprano's range. The dotted six-teenth notes in the third movement have to be adjusted to the triplet rhythm. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 528

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.04.2020
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