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Bassline
39,00 € *
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A bassline is the term used in many styles of popular music, such as jazz, blues, funk, dub and electronic music for the low-pitched instrumental part or line played by a rhythm section instrument such as the electric bass, double bass or keyboard. Basslines in popular music often use "riffs" or "grooves", which are usually simple, appealing musical motifs or phrases that are repeated, with variation, throughout the song. Bassline riffs usually emphasize the chord tones of each chord which helps to define a song's key. At the same time, basslines work along with the drum part and the other rhythm instruments to create a clear rhythmic pulse. The type of rhythmic pulse used in basslines varies widely in different types of music. In swing jazz and jump blues, basslines are often created from a continuous sequence of quarter notes in a mostly scalar, stepwise part called a "walking bass line." In latin, salsa music, jazz fusion, reggae, electronica, and some types of rock and metal, basslines may be very rhythmically complex and syncopated. In bluegrass and traditional country music, basslines often emphasize the root and fifth of each chord

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.04.2020
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Trans Am (band)
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Nathan Means (bass, vocals, keyboard), Philip Manley (lead guitar, keyboard, voice) and Sebastian Thomson (a.k.a. "Seb") (drums, other sounds) formed Trans Am in 1990 near Washington, D.C.. The band started as a side project (Phil also played with Oberlin College friends in "Golden"), and after the members had finished college in 1995 they started to seriously record their music. Until 1998, Trans Am''s material was almost strictly instrumental. Their sound is generally marked with acoustic and electronic drums, guitars, electronics, and a varying amount of often-heavily treated vocals. All of their albums have been released on the Chicago-based independent record label, Thrill Jockey. Their self-titled debut, recorded after just a few rehearsals, contained instrumentals which were largely improvised versions of simple rock-oriented motifs based loosely on ''70s bands such as Boston, Bachman-Turner Overdrive and Yes. The album was produced by John McEntire of labelmates Tortoise at Chicago''s Idful Studios. Afterwards, the band opened for Tortoise on a brief US tour.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.04.2020
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Triosonate IV in e-Moll
21,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The first movement has an unusual form. It begins with a slow introduction - a three-part fugue exposition, with a theme apparently resembling that of the second movement. The Vivace starts on the second eighth in bar 5 and is relatively short, compared to the other sonatas. Its melodic lines are particularly driving and energetic. The fugue theme is answered in the octave, which Bach typically does in slower movements. In the Andante, a two-bar phrasing is particulary noticeable. In the first section (bars 1 - 11) the theme is answered in unison, and after a two-bar interlude the theme appears in the dominant. In the second section (bars 11 - 23) the two solo parts develop motifs from the main theme in a beautiful dialogue. The first section is repeated in e-minor without bars 1 - 7. It is followed by the second section, here shifting to G-major. While the bass has almost exclusively served as an accompaniment so far, it is actively involved in the development of the fugue theme in the last movement, Un poc' allegro. It is dominated by a large variety of bubbly triplet figures. The form can either be perceived in three large sections (I. m 1 - 28, II. m 28 - 60, III. m 60 - 87, coda) or as a fugue-rondo with regular theme appearances. Due to the range and for better playability the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. The slurs comply with the Neue Bach Ausgabe. In the manuscripts their beginnings and ends are usually difficult or impossible to determine. Suggestions are printed in dashed slurs. In the second movement the Soprano and Alto parts were exchanged in bar 38 - 40 to accomodate the Soprano's range. The dotted six-teenth notes in the third movement have to be adjusted to the triplet rhythm. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 528

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.04.2020
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Sevilla
35,90 CHF *
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The Spanish composer and pianist Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz’ (y Pascual) fascinating and eventful biography is informatively described in the relevant specialist literature; with a few clicks, though, you might also do some successful research on the internet. Albéniz is considered to be the father of Spanish national music per se. Incorporating rhythms and melodies typical of Spanish folk music, he succeeded in embedding folcloristic elements in virtuoso compositions for the piano. Sevilla is the third movement of the Suite Española No. 1 for Piano, Op. 47. The final version of the suite contains eight characteristic pieces. The title of each one of them refers to a geographical region or city in Spain – including Cuba! The folcloristic and improvisational character of Sevilla results from memorable motifs with characteristic embellishments in the melody, - the imitation of other instruments (guitar, castanets, …) in the setting for piano, asymmetrical phrases,the unexpected appearance of new motifs,noticeable fluctuations in tempo and dynamics,unanticipated modulations, the “faulty” compositional structure (e.g. octave parallels between melody and bass in measure 11), and especially from the rhapsody-like middle part with its virtuoso and at the same time cantabile melody in the upper part. The arrangement presented here is notated one whole tone lower than the original version and has been written according to the proven principle of translating: “as true to the original as possible – as free as necessary”. The movement can be performed as a quintet but also in a choral/orchestral instrumentation. In the latter case, the middle part with the soprano saxophone solo (measures 76 – 79 and measures 104 – 110) is recommended to be executed by five soloists. Instrumentation: 5 saxophones (SAATBar) op. 47

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.04.2020
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Triosonate IV in e-Moll
19,50 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Bach composed the six Trio Sonatas for Organ BWV 525 - 530 probably between 1727 and 1730 when he was Cantor at the St. Thomas Church in Leipzig. The trio sonata as a baroque genre usually employs four players: two solo parts (violin, flute or oboe), a bass part (violoncello, violone or bassoon) and the continuo part (organ, harpsichord or lute). It is assumed that during his time in Köthen (1717 - 1723), Bach composed a few dozen trio sonatas for various instruments, of which very few have survived. In fact, the Triosonata for two Flutes and Continuo BWV 1039, along with the one from the Musical Offering (which was written much later), is the only one of which the authenticity can be regarded as certain. Bach arranged it for Viola da Gamba and harpsichord (BWV 1027). The upper solo part is played by the right hand of the harpsichordist while the Viola plays the second part an octave lower. Later, Bach arranged the last movement for organ (Trio in G). Here, the pedal plays a slightly simplified bass, and the left hand takes up the second part. Maybe some of the movements of the six Trio Sonatas for Organ go back to lost compositions Bach has arranged in a similar manner. There are earlier versions of many movements, and the original of at least one movement (BWV 528, I.) was written for more than one instrument: the Sinfonia of the second part of Cantata BWV 76 which is set for Oboe d'amore, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo. The linear, distinctly chamber music-like disposition of the Sonatas further supports this assumption, and a number of recent recordings of the Sonatas with two solo instruments and basso continuo convincingly justify the reconstruction of a hypothetical original. The first movement has an unusual form. It begins with a slow introduction - a three-part fugue exposition, with a theme apparently resembling that of the second movement. The Vivace starts on the second eighth in bar 5 and is relatively short, compared to the other sonatas. Its melodic lines are particularly driving and energetic. The fugue theme is answered in the octave, which Bach typically does in slower movements. In the Andante, a two-bar phrasing is particulary noticeable. In the first section (bars 1 - 11) the theme is answered in unison, and after a two-bar interlude the theme appears in the dominant. In the second section (bars 11 - 23) the two solo parts develop motifs from the main theme in a beautiful dialogue. The first section is repeated in e-minor without bars 1 - 7. It is followed by the second section, here shifting to G-major. While the bass has almost exclusively served as an accompaniment so far, it is actively involved in the development of the fugue theme in the last movement, Un poc' allegro. It is dominated by a large variety of bubbly triplet figures. The form can either be perceived in three large sections (I. m 1 - 28, II. m 28 - 60, III. m 60 - 87, coda) or as a fugue-rondo with regular theme appearances. Due to the range and for better playability the sonata was transposed a halfstep above the original key. The slurs comply with the Neue Bach Ausgabe. In the manuscripts their beginnings and ends are usually difficult or impossible to determine. Suggestions are printed in dashed slurs. In the second movement the Soprano and Alto parts were exchanged in bar 38 - 40 to accomodate the Soprano's range. The dotted six-teenth notes in the third movement have to be adjusted to the triplet rhythm. Instrumentation: 3 saxophones (SABar/SAT) BWV 528

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.04.2020
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Sevilla
25,70 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The Spanish composer and pianist Isaac Manuel Francisco Albéniz’ (y Pascual) fascinating and eventful biography is informatively described in the relevant specialist literature; with a few clicks, though, you might also do some successful research on the internet. Albéniz is considered to be the father of Spanish national music per se. Incorporating rhythms and melodies typical of Spanish folk music, he succeeded in embedding folcloristic elements in virtuoso compositions for the piano. Sevilla is the third movement of the Suite Española No. 1 for Piano, Op. 47. The final version of the suite contains eight characteristic pieces. The title of each one of them refers to a geographical region or city in Spain – including Cuba! The folcloristic and improvisational character of Sevilla results from memorable motifs with characteristic embellishments in the melody, - the imitation of other instruments (guitar, castanets, …) in the setting for piano, asymmetrical phrases,the unexpected appearance of new motifs,noticeable fluctuations in tempo and dynamics,unanticipated modulations, the “faulty” compositional structure (e.g. octave parallels between melody and bass in measure 11), and especially from the rhapsody-like middle part with its virtuoso and at the same time cantabile melody in the upper part. The arrangement presented here is notated one whole tone lower than the original version and has been written according to the proven principle of translating: “as true to the original as possible – as free as necessary”. The movement can be performed as a quintet but also in a choral/orchestral instrumentation. In the latter case, the middle part with the soprano saxophone solo (measures 76 – 79 and measures 104 – 110) is recommended to be executed by five soloists. Instrumentation: 5 saxophones (SAATBar) op. 47

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.04.2020
Zum Angebot

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